Issues older, but still interesting and relevant

Prorogation: truths and myths in Ontario
Between elections, a term of a federal parliament, or provincial (or in the USA, state) Legislature is seldom, if ever, composed of one long session. Federal, provincial and state governments typically divide the term of a parliament or legislature into two or more sessions, divided by an end-of-session act called a prorogation. In Ontario, the Legislature used to ‘prorogue’ every Christmas, with its return in mid- to late-winter coming with a new Speech from the Throne, outlining the government’s agenda going forward. Today in Ontario, the Legislature typically has two, and sometimes three sessions. After the 2003 election, there was a brief prorogation in September of 2005. After the 2007 election, there was a very short prorogation in the winter of 2009. And after the 2011 election, there was an eight-week prorogation in the autumn of 2012. Read more here.
The ups and downs of gas pump prices
Clearly, the phones in the offices of elected representatives at all levels ring when gas prices shoot up. Not even in the dreams of the staff would a telephone ring with someone saying, “Hey man, thanks for bringing down gas prices!” The truth is that MPs, MPPs and city councillors — or their governments at the federal, provincial and municipal levels — have no ability to influence global commodity prices (oil, wheat, metals, meats, wood products etc.) unilaterally.
Whether the price at the pump is going up or down, and in the years and decades to come, it will move both ways more than once, here is a link to some thoughts on gas prices in Ontario and worldwide, as well as other places to look for information or somebody at whom to vent.

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